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2 edition of Stock assessment of the chinook salmon return to the Naknek River, Alaska, during 1992 found in the catalog.

Stock assessment of the chinook salmon return to the Naknek River, Alaska, during 1992

Lewis G. Coggins

Stock assessment of the chinook salmon return to the Naknek River, Alaska, during 1992

by Lewis G. Coggins

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  • 23 Currently reading

Published by Alaska Dept. of Fish and Game, Division of Sport Fish in Anchorage, Alaska .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Chinook salmon -- Alaska -- Naknek River.,
  • Salmon fisheries -- Alaska -- Naknek River.

  • About the Edition

    Drift gill nets were used to capture 1,068 adult chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the lower Naknek River for marking as part of a mark-recapture experiment. Marked fish were recaptured during a creel survey of the sport fishery and during escapement surveys of the spawning grounds. Based on recovery data from the escapement surveys, an estimated 51,344 chinook salmon 635 millimeters entered the lower Naknek River from 5 June until 14 August. During the escapement recovery event in which 681 chinook salmon, 635 millimeters or greater in length, were examined, only 13 had been marked in the marking event. Due to this extremely low recapture rate, and a similarly low recapture rate during the sport fishery recovery event, a host of assumptions required for unbiased estimates of inriver abundance were not tested. Because these assumptions were not addressed and because the estimated inriver abundance minus the estimated sport harvest is nearly nine times as large as the total average historical escapement index, this estimate is believed to be biased high by an unknown amount. An estimated 28,428 hours of effort were expended by recreational anglers fishing the lower Naknek River from 8 June through 31 July 1992. This estimate is 40% below the recent 4-year average (1988-1991) of 47,654 hours. Anglers caught (landed) and harvested (kept) an estimated 3,362 and 2,949 (88% harvested) chinook salmon, 156 and 156 (100% harvested) coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch, 456 and 413 (91% harvested) chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta, and 1,760 and 25 (1% harvested) rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Age-1.4 (47%) and -1.3 (24%) chinook salmon dominated the harvest. An emergency order which prohibited fishing for chinook salmon in King Salmon Creek and Paul"s Creek, as well as the waters surrounding their confluences with the Naknek River, took effect 1 June. These closures were enacted in an attempt to provide adequate chinook salmon escapement into these streams as well as to provide protection to a major milling area located at the confluence of King Salmon Creek and the Naknek River. The emergency order was only partially effective as both Paul"s Creek and King Salmon Creek received below average escapements. The spawning escapement index of chinook salmon, as determined by aerial survey counts of live fish in the four major spawning areas, was 2,621 fish which was well below the 1970-1991 average of 5,524 fish.

    Edition Notes

    Statementby Lewis G. Coggins, Jr. and Allen E. Bingham.
    SeriesFishery data series -- no. 93-26.
    ContributionsBingham, Allen E., Alaska. Division of Sport Fish.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvi, 78 p. :
    Number of Pages78
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15578293M

    The world's wild king salmon stocks are disappearing. In , abnormally high river water temperatures in Oregon triggered a die-off of threatened chinkooks. In , the Pacific Fishery and Management Council closed miles of the West Coast to ocean salmon fishing to protect a record-low run of Klamath River chinook. In Alaska—the world's last major, wild commercial salmon fishery—the. spatial segregation of chinook and sockeye salmon in the Kenai River facilitated chinook-specific counts. This paper describes the feasibility studies (–) and management-level program (–) using dual-beam sonar to count chinook salmon. During this time a comprehensive hydroacous-tic data acquisition and processing system was.

    The ambitious effort marks the start of a state-backed five year, $30 million Chinook Salmon Research Initiative that includes 12 major river systems from Southeast Alaska to the Yukon. And while it will be years before the project yields definitive data, the scientists have pinned down some early findings. The Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) is Alaska’s state fish and is one of the most important sport and commercial fish native to the Pacific coast of North is the largest of all Pacific salmon, with weights of individual fish commonly exceeding 30 pounds. A pound Chinook salmon taken in a fish trap near Petersburg, Alaska in is the largest on record.

      Alaska Department of Fish and Game Chinook salmon research team () Chinook salmon stock assessment and research plan, ADF&G Spec Publ No 13–01, 56 p. Litzow MA, Mueter FJ () Assessing the ecological importance of climate regime shifts: An approach from the North Pacific Ocean. Prog Oceanogr –   The Nushagak River is a world-class King/Chinook Salmon river Articles and videos on Nushagak River Fishing brought to you by Alaska King Salmon Adventures. J [email protected] Book Your Adventure Today.


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Stock assessment of the chinook salmon return to the Naknek River, Alaska, during 1992 by Lewis G. Coggins Download PDF EPUB FB2

Chinook Stock Assessment & Research Project. Chinook Salmon Research Initiative. Chinook (king) salmon have been returning in fewer numbers to many rivers across Alaska sincerequiring painful restrictions on fisheries that harvest these stocks. The finalized Chinook Salmon Stock Assessment and Research Plan,is now available.

This plan results from collaboration and partnering with federal agencies and academia to develop the gap analysis and convening the Chinook Salmon Symposium to inform.

The department conducted smolt marking feasibility studies during that concluded Willow Creek (a Susitna River tributary) was the most suitable stock to describe the marine harvest of upper Cook Inlet Chinook salmon.

During juvenile Chinook salmon in Willow Creek were marked with coded wire tags and a weir was operated for. Chinook salmon are critically important to local subsistence, commercial and sport users.

Nushagak River Chinook salmon are managed under guidelines of the Nushagak-Mulchatna King Salmon Management Plan, adopted into regulation by the Alaska Board of Fish in Scale pattern analyses have estimated that western Alaska (particularly Yukon River) was the predominant regional stock of Chinook salmon migrating.

The Copper River Chinook salmon stock is composed of six major spawning stocks. Upriver stocks, like the Gulkana and Chistochina, are genetically distinct and exhibit early run-timing patterns; these stocks are targeted by fishers because of their early entry in to the river and importance to commercial, subsistence, personal-use, and sport fisheries.

In contrast, Red River, which has been heavily supplemented with Rapid River stock, is very similar genetically to spring chinook salmon samples from Rapid River Hatchery and the upper Salmon River. InWilliam Miller of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at Dworshak Hatchery provided NMFS with 11 adult and 19 juvenile chinook salmon taken.

The daily limit on the Naknek River for Chinook is 1 king per person per day up to 5 per season. The average king salmon on the Naknek River weighs between 15 and 35 pounds and a big king in this river can reach over 50 pounds. Guests appreciate that the king run is among the best in Alaska without the high angler pressure.

Hooking mortality of Chinook salmon released in the Kenai River, Alaska. North American Journal of Fisheries Management Bernard, D. R., J. Parker, and R. Lafferty. Stock assessment of burbot populations in small and moderate-size lakes.

North American Journal of Fisheries Management Chinook salmon sexually mature between the ages of 2 and 7 but are typically 3 or 4 years old when they return to spawn. Chinook dig out gravel nests (redds) on stream bottoms where they lay their eggs. All Chinook salmon die after spawning.

Young Chinook salmon feed on terrestrial and aquatic insects, amphipods, and other crustaceans. Genetic stock identification of the salmon bycatch from commercial trawl fisheries in the Bering Sea and Gulf of Alaska is completed each year to determine which salmon stocks are most affected by the fisheries.

Stock composition reports are completed annually by the Alaska Fisheries Science Center’s Genetics Program for chum and Chinook salmon in the Bering Sea and Gulf of Alaska. Sincethe number of returning adults has ranged from to 10, large fish, and averaged 4, large fish.

During June and July a set gillnet is operated approximately 2 miles up from the mouth of the river to capture returning Unuk River Chinook salmon.

The Unuk River is a glacial system located approximately 85 km northeast of Ketchikan, Alaska. Over the past couple of decades this river has supported runs of Chinook salmon averaging about 5, large (essentially 28" and greater in length) Chinook salmon.

Find the perfect chinook salmon alaska stock photo. Huge collection, amazing choice, + million high quality, affordable RF and RM images. No need to register, buy now. Arrows show the forecasted returns for Chinook salmon in (solid line) and (dashed line). The mean rank of the ocean ecosystem indicators in was forecasting a return ofandadult spring and fall Chinook salmon to the Bonneville Dam respectively in.

Chinook salmon are anadromous fish, which means they can live in both fresh and saltwater. Chinook salmon have a relatively complex life history that includes spawning and juvenile rearing in rivers followed by migrating to saltwater to feed, grow, and mature before returning to freshwater to spawn.

Juvenile Chinook salmon stock proportions in the northern shelf region (north of 60°N) were: 44% Upper Yukon, 24% Middle Yukon, 31% Coastal Western Alaska, and 1% other western Alaska stock. Alaska State Fish King or Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Adopted in The giant king salmon, (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha,) is the state fish of Alaska (also called Chinook salmon, spring salmon, quinnat, tyee, tule, and blackmouth salmon) and is a popular sport became Alaska's state fish in The king salmon is native to the Pacific coast of North America.

Snake River spring/summer Chinook. Listed as threatened in Innea wild spring/summer Chinook returned to the Snake River basin. Abundance for spring/summer Chinook has been increasing since These fish spawn in the upper reaches of the Salmon River and other high mountain Idaho rivers.

Snake River Fall Chinook. Chinook salmon’s olfactory senses are so precise that they can smell one drop of water from their natal stream mixed with gallons of seawater.

Chinook salmon return to their natal streams to spawn after they have reached maturity, about years. This mass migration and spawning event occurs between July and August. Chinook salmon are the largest Pacific salmon species and, on average, grow to be three feet ( meters) long and approximately 30 pounds (13 kilograms).

However, some Chinook salmon can reach more than five feet ( meters) long and pounds (50 kilograms). The salmon are blue-green on .The Chinook salmon that Lewis and Clark saw is by far the largest and certainly the most plentiful.

It is also known as King Salmon. Like the other species, Chinook salmon, as the Coyote legend suggests, are anadramous—meaning they spend their adult lives in the ocean but migrate upriver to freshwater ponds or creeks to spawn.The Kenai River is famous for its Salmon, including a 97 lb, 4 oz King that set the rod-and-reel world record in This river consistently produces the biggest Salmon in Alaska, which means some of the best fighting action in the state.

It’s also one of few rivers in the world where you can find all five Pacific Salmon species.